Tag Archives: PowerCLI

How to send vCenter alarms to Slack

I’m spending some of my time in the new gig with my old sysadmin ops hat on.  We needed a quick easy way to keep an eye on alerts from a vSphere environment so….what else would be more fun than to funnel them to Slack?!  Easy peasy, even on the vCenter Appliance.  Let’s see how…

First you need to configure the integration on Slack.   In the channel you wish to see the alerts in, click the “Add a service integration” link.

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Now there is not any special integration with vSphere, we are going to be using a simple REST api to push the content.  Scroll down to “Incoming WebHooks”

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Now you need to approve the integration verifying the chat room and click the button:

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The outcome of this will be a long URL you will need for the script.

Now we need to get your script ready. Now remember this is on vCenter (windows OR appliance), not ESXi.  Much credit to this guy that created a simple script for Zabbix, as this is a hacked up version of it.   The key here is using the environment $VMWARE_ALARM_EVENTDESCRIPTION which I use because it’s short and simple.   If you want other types of data check out the documentation here.

Now you just simply need to hook this script up to the alarm in vSphere:

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Sweet.  Cool.  Let there be (kind of) chatops.

But, I hear you asking…   What if you want to apply this to all your alarms??   Also…. easy peasy.   I just whipped together some powercli and bam.

That line will apply this script action to ALL alarms in the vCenter you connect to.   It will apply this by default to the Yellow to Red action level.    For now I wanted this to trip on all four cases so I looked a little deeper and found this will do it:

Now if you are like me and you screw this up along the way, you may have to clear out the actions across the board.  This line will do that for you:

 

 

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Using vSphere Tags via vCO

As vSphere 5.5 currently stands, the only way to interact with vSphere tags is via PowerCLI.   This leaves vCO out of the party without some effort to build it manually.   I am working on a solution where I wanted to include tags in some automation to enable some awesomeness so I explored if it was possible to expose to this vCO without huge effort.  Success!

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It wasn’t too difficult to build this.  The two most difficult parts were setting up the PowerShell host for vCO (google it… it’s difficult.. at least it was for me the first time around), and parsing of the XML returned from PowerShell to vCO to get the data I wanted.   These workflows are a bit rough but they work as a first draft.   For anything production caliber you’ll want to evaluate the performance impact of hitting the powershell host as often, and definitely change the password field from string (proof of concepts!).

What I have built so far is a workflow “JaaS Tags- Add Tag” that accepts strings for the name of the tag, and virtual machine name.  This fires off powershell commands in a vCO action:

 

To show how it works running manually in the vCO client:

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And to show that the tag is actually applied, you can find it in the Web Client:

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Now, I also have a workflow to find VMs from the tag that is supplied.  I needed flexibility out of these in the solution that i’m working on so the output from this one is two arrays – one of the name in a string, and one of VC:VirtualMachine type.

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Running this guy manually, just supply the tag name:

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And to show the output parameters, you can see that in the vCO client:

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Yay Tags!   Now you can include these workflows in other solutions to utilize tags in ways they weren’t intended.  Stay tuned for the solution I built this for.

I’ve posted an export of this package to FlowGrab, check it out here:  https://flowgrab.com/project/view.xhtml?id=d2623373-838f-4ee2-8d6e-c6f582cb452f

 

 

 

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